Simply, a Ground Rent is a fee, usually paid twice per year, that is paid to an investor who owns the ground under the property.  Grounds rents are 99-year leases that automatically renew for additional terms of 99-years each.  The amount of ground rent due never changes.  As the owner of the building subject to a ground rent, the building owner must maintain the property and pay the taxes.    As long as the ground rent is paid, the building owner can be secure in their property ownership; no one is going to take away the property.

The owner of a property subject to a Ground Rent can buy-out, or redeem, the ground rent.  If you offer to redeem the ground rent at the statutory redemption rate, the ground rent owner must sell it to you.

The Statutory Redemption Rate varies depending on the date the ground rent was created.  Some ground rents are not redeemable.

The following only applies to residential ground rent leases with a term of 99 years.  It does not apply to ground leases on commercial property or commercial-multi-family property, including co-ops.

Original Lease DateMultiply the Annual Rent * byor divide the Annual Rent * byFor Example
April 8, 1884 to April 5, 1888250.04$96 * 25 = $2,400
$96 / 0.04 = $2,400
After July 1, 19828.330.12$96 * 8.33 = $800
$96 / 0/12 = $800
If the ground rent was created at any other time16.660.06$96 * 16.11 = $1,600
$96 / 0.06 = $1,600

* Rents are sometimes quoted as an ANNUAL and sometimes as a SEMI-ANNUAL price.  Make sure you calculate based on the ANNUAL rent, not the semi-annual rent.

You can force redemption of a Ground Rent only after it has seasoned:

Original Lease DateRedeemable After:
July 1, 1971 or laterThe Ground Rent must be in existence for at least 3 years before you can force redemption.
July 1, 1969 to July 1, 1971 or July 1, 1982 or laterThe Ground Rent must be in existence for at least 5 years before you can force redemption.
Before July 1, 1969The Ground Rent can be redeemed at any time

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